A fun little collection of stuff I like.
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Other stuff I like...

Vancouver-based artist Fiona Tang creates large-scale murals of animals using charcoal, chalk pastel, and acrylic on paper that at first glance appear 3D.

Portugal’s street art has really evolved over the years with an impressive number of artists, and you can see some of their work on websites like Stick2TargetMr. Dheo, andUnderdogs. One of the house hold names is Odeith, a graffiti rider since 1996, spray painting cabinets and walls in railway routes. An innovator for using perspective illusionto compose pop-out letters on different surfaces, which led to other artists doing the same. Despite the illegal nature of graffiti in the modern era, much has changed for some writers in the last decade.

Nighttime in Tokyo

Japan is a country full of amazing art. Some of it is housed within museums and galleries while others are right underneath our feet. Just about anywhere in the country you can find stylized manhole covers, each more beautiful and intricate than the next. 

Montreal based A’shop crew is an artist-run production company that creates graffiti murals, street art, and other public art displays. Most of their work is heavily influenced by graffiti but has also found inspiration elsewhere like their 2011 piece titled Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (top) that borrows from the art nouveau style of Alphonse Mucha. 

Can I have it?

Since 2006 artist Joe Mangrum has taken to the streets of New York, Chicago, San Francisco and elsewhere armed with sacks of colored sand that he sprinkles by the handful to create sprawling temporary paintings. Each work is spontaneous in its design and evolves as Mangrum works, spending upwards of 6-8 hours hunched over the ground to complete each piece.

Each image begins with 8mm or 16mm camera film strips which he lays down in rows to create a larger surface that effectively acts as a single piece of film. Park then exposes two images in a large format 8×10″ camera using sets of vertical and horizontal strips which are woven together to create a final print. Seung Hoon Park

Polish artists Sainer and Bezt, collectively known as Etam Cru, paint large scale murals of surreal and frequently humerous subjects in locations mostly around Eastern Europe. 

The world’s largest nature aquarium and aquatic plants layout competition is the International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest (IAPLC) which annually ranks hundreds of competitors from around the world with Asian and Eastern European countries generally dominating the top slots. While it’s somewhat difficult to track down galleries of winners from every year, above are some amazing entries from the last few years.

In the midst of our daily binge of emailing, Tweeting, Facebooking, app downloading and photoshopping it’s almost hard to imagine how anything was done without the help of a computer. For Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo, it’s a time he relishes. At a technology-free drafting table he deftly renders the motion and subtle mathematical brilliance of nature with a pencil, ruler and protractor. Araujo creates complex fields of three dimensional space where butterflies take flight and the logarithmic spirals of shells swirl into existence. He calls the series of work Calculation, and many of his drawings seem to channel the look and feel of illustrations found in Da Vinci’s sketchbooks. In an age when 3D programs can render a digital version of something like this in just minutes, it makes you appreciate Araujo’s remarkable skill. You can see much more here. (via ArchitectureAtlas)